You Need A Good Dive Watch

Dive watches are one of the staple watch styles that have been around since the 1950s. Dive watches can be an indispensable tool underwater, but they are also a symbol of the rugged explorer in all of us. Whether you’re just diving into a huge workload at your desk, or actually spending some time deep underwater, one thing is clear — a dive watch would be great to have on your wrist.

All divers’ watches share certain characteristics that make them divers’ watches: unidirectional rotating bezels, secure screw-down crowns, higher-than-typical water resistance. Some of these divers’ watches, however, go the extra mile with cases that can descend to 3,000 or even 4,000 meters, chronographs operable at incredible depths, or high-tech depth gauge devices built into their mechanical movements.

The purpose of a dive watch is to monitor how long you’ve been underwater, and more importantly – how much air you have left in your tank. Divers entrust their watches with their lives to be able to know precisely how much time they have underwater. For dive watches, reliable durability and construction are critical. Look for a dive watch with a well-built case, a strong crystal (mineral and sapphire are best), and a good strap or bracelet. A solid dive watch will last for decades if maintained.

Dive watches are often chunky and bold, in part for aesthetics, and in part for their need to withstand the extreme pressures with traveling well below the water’s surface. From a visual standpoint a dive watch is easy to spot. Its markers and hands are big, easy to read, and have some sort of luminous material applied to them. Dive watch remains one of the most popular timepiece categories.

The Rolex Sea-Dweller Deepsea has a water-resistance level of 3,900 meters (nearly 13,000 feet), and it is more than 10 percent slimmer than it otherwise would have been thanks to a special case construction developed by Rolex replica. It consists of three pressure-absorbing elements: a 5.5 mm thick sapphire crystal, a 3.28-mm-thick caseback made of grade 5 titanium, and an inner ring made of Biodur-108 steel. Last summer, Rolex launched the new Rolex Deepsea D-Blue Edition (pictured above), with a proprietary “D-Blue” dial that is dark blue at the top, and then darkens gradually to black at the bottom.